New genetic evidence of affinities and discontinuities between bronze age Siberian populations.

@article{Hollard2018NewGE,
  title={New genetic evidence of affinities and discontinuities between bronze age Siberian populations.},
  author={Cl{\'e}mence Hollard and Vincent Zv{\'e}nigorosky and Alexey Kovalev and Yu.F. Kiryushin and Alexey A. Tishkin and I. Lazaretov and {\'E}ric Crub{\'e}zy and Bertrand Ludes and Christine Keyser},
  journal={American journal of physical anthropology},
  year={2018},
  volume={167 1},
  pages={
          97-107
        }
}
OBJECTIVES This work focuses on the populations of South Siberia during the Eneolithic and Bronze Age and specifically on the contribution of uniparental lineage and phenotypical data to the question of the genetic affinities and discontinuities between western and eastern populations. MATERIALS AND METHODS We performed molecular analyses on the remains of 28 ancient humans (10 Afanasievo (3600-2500 BC) and 18 Okunevo (2500-1800 BC) individuals). For each sample, two uniparentally inherited… 

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