New generation antipsychotic drugs and compliance behaviour

@article{Voruganti2008NewGA,
  title={New generation antipsychotic drugs and compliance behaviour},
  author={Lakshmi N. P. Voruganti and Laura K. Baker and A. George Awad},
  journal={Current Opinion in Psychiatry},
  year={2008},
  volume={21},
  pages={133–139}
}
Purpose of review Antipsychotic therapy has been eclipsed by high rates of noncompliance; the problem was attributed to a lack of efficacy and the burden of side effects of neuroleptics. This review sought to examine whether the arrival of second generation (atypical) antipsychotic drugs with low side-effect liability and improved efficacy has helped to positively reinforce compliance behaviour among people treated for schizophrenia. Recent findings The number of studies that systematically… 
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The results suggest that the combination of a cognition-oriented and a symptom-oriented approach ameliorate psychotic symptoms and cognitive biases and represents a promising complementary treatment for schizophrenia.
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TLDR
Patients on certain SGAs, notably olanzapine, are more likely to continue with their treatment that those on FGAs, and the influence of several socio-demographic and clinical variables on adherence in the two antipsychotic groups is examined.
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