New fossils from Koobi Fora in northern Kenya confirm taxonomic diversity in early Homo

@article{Leakey2012NewFF,
  title={New fossils from Koobi Fora in northern Kenya confirm taxonomic diversity in early Homo},
  author={Meave G. Leakey and Fred Spoor and M. Christopher Dean and Craig S. Feibel and Susan C. Ant{\'o}n and Christopher Kiarie and Louise N. Leakey},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2012},
  volume={488},
  pages={201-204}
}
Since its discovery in 1972 (ref. 1), the cranium KNM-ER 1470 has been at the centre of the debate over the number of species of early Homo present in the early Pleistocene epoch of eastern Africa. KNM-ER 1470 stands out among other specimens attributed to early Homo because of its larger size, and its flat and subnasally orthognathic face with anteriorly placed maxillary zygomatic roots. This singular morphology and the incomplete preservation of the fossil have led to different views as to… Expand
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