New fossil remains of Homo naledi from the Lesedi Chamber, South Africa

@article{Hawks2017NewFR,
  title={New fossil remains of Homo naledi from the Lesedi Chamber, South Africa},
  author={John Hawks and Marina Elliott and P. Lennart Schmid and Steven Emilio Churchill and Darryl J. de Ruiter and Eric M. Roberts and Hannah L. Hilbert-Wolf and Heather M Garvin and Scott A. Williams and Lucas K. Delezene and Elen M. Feuerriegel and Patrick S Randolph-Quinney and Tracy L. Kivell and Myra F. Laird and Gaokgatlhe M. Tawane and Jeremy M. DeSilva and Shara E. Bailey and Juliet K. Brophy and Marc R. Meyer and Matthew M. Skinner and Matthew W. Tocheri and Caroline Vansickle and Christopher S. Walker and Timothy L. Campbell and Brian F. Kuhn and Ashley Kruger and Steven A. Tucker and Alia N. Gurtov and Nompumelelo Beryl Hlophe and Rick Hunter and Hannah Morris and Becca Peixotto and Maropeng Ramalepa and Dirk van Rooyen and Mathabela Tsikoane and Pedro Boshoff and Paul Hgm Dirks and Lee R. Berger},
  journal={eLife},
  year={2017},
  volume={6}
}
Key ResultThe Rising Star cave system has produced abundant fossil hominin remains within the Dinaledi Chamber, representing a minimum of 15 individuals attributed to Homo naledi. Further exploration led to the discovery of hominin material, now comprising 131 hominin specimens, within a second chamber, the Lesedi Chamber. The Lesedi Chamber is far separated from the Dinaledi Chamber within the Rising Star cave system, and represents a second depositional context for hominin remains.

Immature Hominin Craniodental Remains From a New Locality in the Rising Star Cave System, South Africa

Homo naledi is known from the Rising Star cave system, South Africa, where its remains have previously been reported from two localities: the Dinaledi Chamber (U.W. 101) and Lesedi Chamber (U.W.

Upper Limb Fossils of Homo naledi from the Lesedi Chamber, Rising Star System, South Africa

These new findings support the interpretation of overhead reaching and climbing behaviors having continued relevance in the locomotor repertoire of Homo naledi and provide a clearer picture of the upper limb morphology of this species.

Endocast morphology of Homo naledi from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa

The endocast anatomy of this recently discovered species Homo naledi is described, suggesting that innovations in brain structure were ancestral within the genus Homo.

Homo naledi and Pleistocene hominin evolution in subequatorial Africa

H. naledi casts the fossil and archaeological records into a new light, as it is now evident that a diversity of hominin lineages existed in this region, with some divergent lineages contributing DNA to living humans and at least H. nalingi representing a survivor from the earliest stages of diversification within Homo.

Homo naledi pelvic remains from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa.

Morphology of the Homo naledi femora from Lesedi.

The Lesedi femora increase the range of variation of femoral morphology in H. naledi by preserving anatomy previously unidentified or unconfirmed in the species, including an anteroposteriorly expanded midshaft and anteriorly expanded patellar surface.

Palaeodemographics of individuals in Dinaledi Chamber using dental remains

The Dinaledi Chamber sample is notable in comparison to other samples of human, chimpanzee and fossil hominins in that it has a relatively high representation of juvenile remains, as compared to infants and adults.

Remains of a barn owl (Tyto alba) from the Dinaledi Chamber, Rising Star Cave, South Africa

Excavations during November 2013 in the Rising Star Cave, South Africa uncovered over 1550 specimens of a new hominin, Homo naledi. A total of four modern bird bones were collected from the surface
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