New adapiform primate fossils from the late Eocene of Egypt

@article{Seiffert2018NewAP,
  title={New adapiform primate fossils from the late Eocene of Egypt},
  author={E. Seiffert and D. Boyer and J. Fleagle and G. Gunnell and C. P. Heesy and Jonathan M G Perry and H. Sallam},
  journal={Historical Biology},
  year={2018},
  volume={30},
  pages={204 - 226}
}
Abstract Caenopithecine adapiform primates are currently represented by two genera from the late Eocene of Egypt (Afradapis and Aframonius) and one from the middle Eocene of Switzerland (Caenopithecus). All are somewhat anthropoid-like in several aspects of their dental and gnathic morphology, and are inferred to have been highly folivorous. Here we describe a new caenopithecine genus and species, Masradapis tahai, from the ~37 million-year-old Locality BQ-2 in Egypt, that is represented by… Expand
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