New Evidence Supporting Wolverhampton as the Location of the First Working Newcomen Engine

@article{Rana2009NewES,
  title={New Evidence Supporting Wolverhampton as the Location of the First Working Newcomen Engine},
  author={Suhail Rana},
  journal={The International Journal for the History of Engineering \& Technology},
  year={2009},
  volume={79},
  pages={162 - 173}
}
  • Suhail Rana
  • Published 1 July 2009
  • History
  • The International Journal for the History of Engineering & Technology
Abstract It is generally accepted that the first successful steam engine was erected by Thomas Newcomen with his partner John Calley in 1712 on a site near Dudley Castle, West Midlands but contradictory evidence exists that suggests the first successful engine was actually built in Wolverhampton. Long-standing evidence supporting Wolverhampton includes letters in French written by Newcomen engineer John O'Kelly in 1721 to a business associate and by J.T. Desaguliers FRS in his Course of… 
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List of Publications on the Economic and Social History of Great Britain and Ireland Published in 2009
(The place of publication is London and the date 2009 unless otherwise stated.)