Neuroticism modulates amygdala—prefrontal connectivity in response to negative emotional facial expressions

@article{Cremers2010NeuroticismMA,
  title={Neuroticism modulates amygdala—prefrontal connectivity in response to negative emotional facial expressions},
  author={Henk R. Cremers and Liliana R. Demenescu and Andr{\'e} Aleman and Remco J. Renken and Marie-Jos{\'e} van Tol and Nic J. A. van der Wee and Dick J. Veltman and Karin Roelofs},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2010},
  volume={49},
  pages={963-970}
}
Neuroticism is associated with the experience of negative affect and the development of affective disorders. While evidence exists for a modulatory role of neuroticism on task induced brain activity, it is unknown how neuroticism affects brain connectivity, especially the crucial coupling between the amygdala and the prefrontal cortex. Here we investigate this relation between functional connectivity and personality in response to negative facial expressions. Sixty healthy control participants… 
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