Corpus ID: 49325040

Neuroticism and the mental noise hypothesis: Relationships to lapses of attention and slips of action in everyday life

@article{Flehmig2007NeuroticismAT,
  title={Neuroticism and the mental noise hypothesis: Relationships to lapses of attention and slips of action in everyday life},
  author={Hagen C. Flehmig and Michael B. Steinborn and R. Langner and K. Westhoff},
  journal={Psychology Science},
  year={2007},
  volume={49},
  pages={343-360}
}
  • Hagen C. Flehmig, Michael B. Steinborn, +1 author K. Westhoff
  • Published 2007
  • Psychology
  • Psychology Science
  • We investigated the relationship between neuroticism and cognitive failure liability in everyday-life situations. Previous research (e.g., Robinson & Tamir, 2005; Robinson, Wilkowski & Meier, 2006) reported a positive association between the trait of neuroticism (N) and fluctuations in mental efficiency when performing elementary cognitive operations. High-N individuals were proposed to be characterized by increased noise within information processing from perception to action. To further… CONTINUE READING
    42 Citations

    Figures and Tables from this paper.

    The Ups and Downs of Cognitive Function: Neuroticism and Negative Affect Drive Performance Inconsistency.
    • 5
    • PDF
    Neuroticism as mental noise: Evidence from a continuous tracking task.
    • 2
    On the paradoxical decrease of self-reported cognitive failures with age
    • 17
    • Highly Influenced

    References

    SHOWING 1-10 OF 96 REFERENCES
    The Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ) and its correlates.
    • 2,037
    Neuroticism as mental noise: a relation between neuroticism and reaction time standard deviations.
    • 123
    • Highly Influential
    • PDF
    Cognitive dysfunction in compulsive checkers: further explorations.
    • 121
    Functional impulsivity and reinforcement sensitivity theory.
    • 113
    • PDF
    The error-related negativity as a state and trait measure: motivation, personality, and ERPs in response to errors.
    • 226
    • PDF
    Individual differences in self reported cognitive failures: The attention hypothesis revisited.
    • 22
    • Highly Influential