Neuroticism and extraversion are associated with amygdala resting-state functional connectivity

@article{Aghajani2014NeuroticismAE,
  title={Neuroticism and extraversion are associated with amygdala resting-state functional connectivity},
  author={Moji Aghajani and Ilya M. Veer and Marie-Jos{\'e} van Tol and Andr{\'e} Aleman and Mark A. van Buchem and Dick J. Veltman and Serge A. R. B. Rombouts and Nic J. A. Wee},
  journal={Cognitive, Affective, \& Behavioral Neuroscience},
  year={2014},
  volume={14},
  pages={836-848}
}
  • M. Aghajani, I. Veer, +5 authors N. Wee
  • Published 1 June 2014
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience
The personality traits neuroticism and extraversion are differentially related to socioemotional functioning and susceptibility to affective disorders. However, the neurobiology underlying this differential relationship is still poorly understood. This discrepancy could perhaps best be studied by adopting a brain connectivity approach. Whereas the amygdala has repeatedly been linked to neuroticism and extraversion, no study has yet focused on the intrinsic functional architecture of amygdala… 
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