Neurosteroids: biochemistry and clinical significance

@article{Mellon2002NeurosteroidsBA,
  title={Neurosteroids: biochemistry and clinical significance},
  author={Synthia H Mellon and Lisa D Griffin},
  journal={Trends in Endocrinology \& Metabolism},
  year={2002},
  volume={13},
  pages={35-43}
}
The brain, like the adrenals, gonads and the placenta, is a steroidogenic tissue. However, unlike classic steroidogenic tissues, the synthesis of steroids in the nervous system requires coordinated expression and regulation of genes encoding the steroidogenic enzymes in several different cell types (neurons and glia) at different locations in the nervous system, often at some distance from the cell bodies. Furthermore, the synthesis of these steroids might be developmentally regulated and… 
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