Neurosis and schizophrenia: II. Modern perspectives

Abstract

Of those clinical states which simultaneously or consecutively exhibitsymptoms of both a neurotic and a schizophrenic nature, two contrasting views are commonly held: Either the state is a schizophrenic one and the neurotic symptoms are reactive, engrafted, accessory, secondary, or pathoplastic; or the state is a mixed or borderline one and each symptom possesses its own significance and importance. Those who maintain the first view hold the concepts of disease processes and disease entities which exclude the possibility that neuroticsymptom complexes may develop into schizophrenia. Those who maintain the second view hold the concept of reaction sets, which allows the possibility that neuroticsymptom complexes may develop into schizophrenia. Because the two views with their associated concepts represent critical differences in regard to the nature both of schizophrenia and of the neuroses, a further inquiry into the question of whether neurotic symptom complexes do, in fact, develop into schizophrenia will follow (Parkin, 1966b).

DOI: 10.1007/BF01562755

Cite this paper

@article{Parkin1966NeurosisAS, title={Neurosis and schizophrenia: II. Modern perspectives}, author={Alan Parkin}, journal={The Psychiatric Quarterly}, year={1966}, volume={40}, pages={217-235} }