Neuroscience: Glia — more than just brain glue

@article{Allen2009NeuroscienceG,
  title={Neuroscience: Glia — more than just brain glue},
  author={Nicola J. Allen and Ben A Barres},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2009},
  volume={457},
  pages={675-677}
}
Glia make up most of the cells in the brain, yet until recently they were believed to have only a passive, supporting role. It is now becoming increasingly clear that these cells have other functions: they make crucial contributions to the formation, operation and adaptation of neural circuitry. 
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Barres are in the Department of Neurobiology
  • Barres are in the Department of Neurobiology
e-mails: njallen@stanford.edu; barres@stanford.edu FURTHER READING
  • e-mails: njallen@stanford.edu; barres@stanford.edu FURTHER READING