Neuropsychology of fear and loathing

@article{Calder2001NeuropsychologyOF,
  title={Neuropsychology of fear and loathing},
  author={Andrew J. Calder and Andrew D. Lawrence and Andrew W. Young},
  journal={Nature Reviews Neuroscience},
  year={2001},
  volume={2},
  pages={352-363}
}
For over 60 years, ideas about emotion in neuroscience and psychology have been dominated by a debate on whether emotion can be encompassed within a single, unifying model. In neuroscience, this approach is epitomized by the limbic system theory and, in psychology, by dimensional models of emotion. Comparative research has gradually eroded the limbic model, and some scientists have proposed that certain individual emotions are represented separately in the brain. Evidence from humans consistent… 

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