Neuropsychiatric Disease and Toxoplasma gondii Infection

@article{Henriquez2009NeuropsychiatricDA,
  title={Neuropsychiatric Disease and Toxoplasma gondii Infection},
  author={Selina A. Henriquez and Ros R. Brett and James Alexander and J A Pratt and Craig W Roberts},
  journal={Neuroimmunomodulation},
  year={2009},
  volume={16},
  pages={122 - 133}
}
Toxoplasma gondii infects approximately 30% of the world’s population, but causes overt clinical symptoms in only a small proportion of people. In recent years, the ability of the parasite to manipulate the behaviour of infected mice and rats and alter personality attributes of humans has been reported. Furthermore, a number of studies have now suggested T. gondii infection as a risk factor for the development of schizophrenia and depression in humans. As T. gondii forms cysts that are located… Expand
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TLDR
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