Neurophysiology of synesthesia

@article{Hubbard2007NeurophysiologyOS,
  title={Neurophysiology of synesthesia},
  author={Edward M. Hubbard},
  journal={Current Psychiatry Reports},
  year={2007},
  volume={9},
  pages={193-199}
}
  • E. Hubbard
  • Published 3 July 2007
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Current Psychiatry Reports
Synesthesia is an experience in which stimulation in one sensory or cognitive stream leads to associated experiences in a second, unstimulated stream. Although synesthesia is often referred to as a “neurological condition,” it is not listed in the DSM IV or the ICD classifications, as it generally does not interfere with normal daily functioning. However, its high prevalence rate (one in 23) means that synesthesia may be reported by patients who present with other psychiatric symptoms. In this… Expand
Color Synesthesia
Synesthesia is a condition in which stimulation in one sensory or cognitive stream involuntarily, or automatically, leads to associated internal or external (illusory or hallucinatory) experiences inExpand
Neuroscience of synesthesia and cross-modal associations
TLDR
This review summarizes and reflects current knowledge concerning synesthesia in its various aspects, including its cognitive, neural, and behavioral aspects. Expand
Color synesthesia. Insight into perception, emotion, and consciousness
TLDR
Results of the recent investigations on synesthesia offered a remarkable insight into the mechanisms of perception, emotion and consciousness, and deserve attention both from neuroscientists and from clinicians. Expand
The brain of synesthetes
Synesthesia is a fascinating phenomenon in which a particular perception induces a concurrent perception resulting in a kind of double perception. This phenomenon has received considerable attractionExpand
On the Nature of Synesthesia: A Learned Association or Something Different?
Synesthesia is a phenomenon that has captivated the interest of many researchers, as it is a unique experience of the blending of the senses. The following study was conducted in an effort toExpand
Auditory synesthesias.
  • P. Afra
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Handbook of clinical neurology
  • 2015
TLDR
In this chapter the three different types of synesthesia, their characteristics, and phenomologic differences, as well as their possible neural mechanisms are discussed. Expand
Disinhibited feedback as a cause of synesthesia: Evidence from a functional connectivity study on auditory-visual synesthetes
TLDR
A functional connectivity analysis on functional magnetic resonance imaging data supported the model of disinhibited feedback as a cause of synesthetic perception but did not suggest direct cross-activation. Expand
Neuroanatomical bases for synesthesia and their implications for perception and consciousness
Synesthesia is a condition that affects an individual’s conscious perception of the world. Individuals with this disorder vary greatly, but have in common the phenomenon of cross-modal perceptions.Expand
Synesthesia, Pseudo-Synesthesia, and Irritable Bowel Syndrome
TLDR
IBS patients clearly differ from controls in terms of claiming to have synesthetic experiences, and these results justify additional studies on the relationship between IBS and synesthesia to further understand the neural mechanisms underpinning these two conditions. Expand
Synesthesia and music perception
TLDR
It is proposed that the existence of a lower, unconscious degree of synesthesia in non-synesthetes would be functional, aiding the construction of abstract associations between different perceptual fields. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 75 REFERENCES
Neurocognitive Mechanisms of Synesthesia
TLDR
Debates in the field relating to the neural basis of synesthesia are focused on, including the relationship between synesthesia and attention and the role of meaning in synesthetic colors. Expand
Synesthesia: A Union of the Senses
For decades, scientists who heard about synesthesia hearing colors, tasting words, seeing colored pain just shrugged their shoulders or rolled their eyes. Now, as irrefutable evidence mounts thatExpand
Mechanisms of synesthesia: cognitive and physiological constraints
TLDR
A neurobiological theory of synesthesia is advanced that fits within a neuroanatomical framework comprising hierarchically organized cortical sensory pathways. Expand
Functional magnetic resonance imaging of synesthesia : activation of V 4 / V 8 by spoken words
•§ In 'colored-hearing' synesthesia, individuals report color experiences when they hear spoken words. If °the synesthetic color experience resembles that of normal color perception, one wouldExpand
Functional magnetic resonance imaging of synesthesia: activation of V4/V8 by spoken words
TLDR
Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), this work locates the region activated by speech in synesthetes to area V4/V8 in the left hemisphere, and demonstrates overlap with V3/V4 activation in normal controls in response to color. Expand
Synesthesia : perspectives from cognitive neuroscience
PART 1: GENERAL OVERVIEW 1. Synesthesia in perspective 2. Some demographic and socio-cultural aspects of synesthesia 3. Varieties of synesthetic experience PART 2: PERCEPTION AND ATTENTION 4. On theExpand
The physiology of coloured hearing. A PET activation study of colour-word synaesthesia.
TLDR
The results suggest that colour-word synaesthesia may result from the activity of brain areas concerned with language and visual feature integration, as conscious visual experience appears to occur without activation of the primary visual cortex. Expand
Anomalous perception in synaesthesia: A cognitive neuroscience perspective
TLDR
The latest findings on synaesthesia are reviewed, and its possible genetic, neural and cognitive bases are considered, and a neurocognitive framework for understanding anomalous perceptual experiences is proposed. Expand
Synaesthesia: The Prevalence of Atypical Cross-Modal Experiences
TLDR
The first test of synaesthesia prevalence with sampling that does not rely on self-referral, and which uses objective tests to establish genuineness is presented, and it is suggested that female biases reported earlier likely arose from (or were exaggerated by) sex differences in self-disclosure. Expand
A systematic , large-scale study of synaesthesia : implications for the role of early experience in lexical-colour associations
For individuals with synaesthesia, stimuli in one sensory modality elicit anomalous experiences in another modality. For example, the sound of a particular piano note may be ‘seen’ as a uniqueExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...