Neurophysiological correlates of memory for experienced and imagined events

@article{Conway2003NeurophysiologicalCO,
  title={Neurophysiological correlates of memory for experienced and imagined events},
  author={Martin A. Conway and Christopher W. Pleydell-Pearce and Sharron E. Whitecross and Helen E. Sharpe},
  journal={Neuropsychologia},
  year={2003},
  volume={41},
  pages={334-340}
}
Changes in slow cortical potentials within EEG were monitored while autobiographical memories of experienced and imagined event were generated and then held in mind for a short period. The generation of both kinds of memory led to significantly larger negative dc shifts over left versus right frontal regions, and this was interpreted as a reflection of substantial left frontal activation. The generation phase was also associated with greater right versus left negative dc shifts over posterior… CONTINUE READING
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