Neurophysiological Determinants of Theoretical Concepts and Mechanisms Involved in Pacing

@article{Roelands2013NeurophysiologicalDO,
  title={Neurophysiological Determinants of Theoretical Concepts and Mechanisms Involved in Pacing},
  author={Bart Roelands and Jos J. de Koning and Carl Clinton Foster and Floor Hettinga and Romain Meeusen},
  journal={Sports Medicine},
  year={2013},
  volume={43},
  pages={301-311}
}
Fatigue during prolonged exercise is often described as an acute impairment of exercise performance that leads to an inability to produce or maintain a desired power output. In the past few decades, interest in how athletes experience fatigue during competition has grown enormously. Research has evolved from a dominant focus on peripheral causes of fatigue towards a complex interplay between peripheral and central limitations of performance. Apparently, both feedforward and feedback mechanisms… 
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