Neuropathological studies of chickens infected with highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

@article{Kobayashi1996NeuropathologicalSO,
  title={Neuropathological studies of chickens infected with highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.},
  author={Y. Kobayashi and T. Horimoto and Y. Kawaoka and D. Alexander and C. Itakura},
  journal={Journal of comparative pathology},
  year={1996},
  volume={114 2},
  pages={
          131-47
        }
}
Central nervous system lesions of chickens inoculated with three highly pathogenic avian influenza virus strains, A/chicken/Victoria/1/85 (H7N7), A/turkey/England/50-92/91 (H5N1), and A/tern/South Africa/61 (H5N3), were examined histologically and immunohistochemically. The chickens either died within 7 days of inoculation or were killed 2 weeks after inoculation. No significant differences were observed in the lesions induced by these three viruses. The lesions were divided into two types… Expand
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