Neuronal control of skin function: the skin as a neuroimmunoendocrine organ.

@article{Roosterman2006NeuronalCO,
  title={Neuronal control of skin function: the skin as a neuroimmunoendocrine organ.},
  author={Dirk Roosterman and Tobias Goerge and Stefan W. Schneider and Nigel W. Bunnett and Martin Steinhoff},
  journal={Physiological reviews},
  year={2006},
  volume={86 4},
  pages={
          1309-79
        }
}
This review focuses on the role of the peripheral nervous system in cutaneous biology and disease. During the last few years, a modern concept of an interactive network between cutaneous nerves, the neuroendocrine axis, and the immune system has been established. We learned that neurocutaneous interactions influence a variety of physiological and pathophysiological functions, including cell growth, immunity, inflammation, pruritus, and wound healing. This interaction is mediated by primary… Expand

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