Neuron loss from the hippocampus of Alzheimer's disease exceeds extracellular neurofibrillary tangle formation

@article{Kril2001NeuronLF,
  title={Neuron loss from the hippocampus of Alzheimer's disease exceeds extracellular neurofibrillary tangle formation},
  author={J. Kril and Smita Patel and A. Harding and G. Halliday},
  journal={Acta Neuropathologica},
  year={2001},
  volume={103},
  pages={370-376}
}
Abstract. Neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) formation in the CA1 region of the hippocampus is one of the early events in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). As the disease progresses more NFTs form and there is substantial neuron loss. In this study we investigated whether NFT formation accounts for all the CA1 pyramidal neuron loss seen in AD. Using unbiased stereological techniques, we estimated the total number of neurons and the number of intra- and extra-cellular NFTs in the… Expand
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