Neurologic music therapy: The beneficial effects of music making on neurorehabilitation

@article{Altenmller2013NeurologicMT,
  title={Neurologic music therapy: The beneficial effects of music making on neurorehabilitation},
  author={E. Altenm{\"u}ller and G. Schlaug},
  journal={Acoustical Science and Technology},
  year={2013},
  volume={34},
  pages={5-12}
}
Making music is a powerful way of engaging a multisensory and motor network and inducing changes and linking brain regions within this network. These multimodal e!ects of music making together with music's ability to tap into the emotion and reward system in the brain can be used to facilitate therapy and rehabilitation of neurological disorders. In this article, we review short- and long-term e!ects of listening to music and making music on functional networks and structural components of the… Expand
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