Neurologic and neuropsychological morbidity following major surgery: comparison of coronary artery bypass and peripheral vascular surgery.

@article{Shaw1987NeurologicAN,
  title={Neurologic and neuropsychological morbidity following major surgery: comparison of coronary artery bypass and peripheral vascular surgery.},
  author={Pamela J. Shaw and David Bates and Niall E. F. Cartlidge and Joyce French and David Heaviside and Desmond G. Julian and D. A. Shaw},
  journal={Stroke},
  year={1987},
  volume={18 4},
  pages={
          700-7
        }
}
As part of a prospective study of the neurologic and neuropsychological complications of coronary artery bypass graft surgery, 312 patients were compared with a control group of 50 patients undergoing major surgery for peripheral vascular disease. The purpose of comparing the 2 groups was to determine to what extent neurologic complications after heart surgery can be attributed to cardiopulmonary bypass. The 2 groups were similar with respect to age, preoperative neurologic and intellectual… Expand
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