Corpus ID: 15760857

Neurologic Examination in the Horse and Medical and Surgical Approaches for Treating Cervical Myelopathies

@inproceedings{NoutLomasNeurologicEI,
  title={Neurologic Examination in the Horse and Medical and Surgical Approaches for Treating Cervical Myelopathies},
  author={Yvette S Nout-Lomas and Dacvecc}
}
Diseases affecting the central nervous system of the horse are common and often interfere with performance. Although gait deficits secondary to neurologic disease are often obvious, some conditions can lead to only subtle gait changes that may be difficult to recognize as being secondary to neurologic disease. The gait deficits in these cases may either be mistaken for musculoskeletal disease or may even occur simultaneous with musculoskeletal disease. If the two co-exist, diagnosis of either… Expand

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References

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