Neuroimaging studies of mood disorders

@article{Drevets2000NeuroimagingSO,
  title={Neuroimaging studies of mood disorders},
  author={Wayne C. Drevets},
  journal={Biological Psychiatry},
  year={2000},
  volume={48},
  pages={813-829}
}
  • W. Drevets
  • Published 15 October 2000
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Biological Psychiatry

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