Neuroimaging studies of mood disorder effects on the brain

@article{Sheline2003NeuroimagingSO,
  title={Neuroimaging studies of mood disorder effects on the brain},
  author={Yvette I. Sheline},
  journal={Biological Psychiatry},
  year={2003},
  volume={54},
  pages={338-352}
}
  • Y. Sheline
  • Published 1 August 2003
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Biological Psychiatry
Studies of early-onset recurrent depression, late life depression associated with neurologic disorders, and bipolar illness have revealed structural brain changes within a neuroanatomical circuit. This circuit, originally described by, has been termed the limbic-cortical-striatal-pallidal-thalamic tract and is comprised of structures which are extensively interconnected. In three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging studies of affective illness, many of the structures that comprise this tract… Expand
Structural MRI Changes of the Brain in Depression
  • A. Kanner
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Clinical EEG and neuroscience
  • 2004
TLDR
The purpose of this article is to briefly review the publshed data on neuroanatomical structural changes associated with major depressive and bipolar disorders. Expand
Brain Structural Effects of Antidepressant Treatment in Major Depression
TLDR
Major findings of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, in relation to treatment response in depressive disorder, will here be presented and discussed. Expand
Neuroimaging and Depression
Major depression is among the most debilitating, prevalent, and recurrent of all psychiatric disorders. Over the past decade, investigators have examined the neural mechanisms associated with thisExpand
Is major depression a neurologic disorder with psychiatric symptoms?
  • A. Kanner
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Epilepsy & Behavior
  • 2004
TLDR
Evidence is provided that major depressive and bipolar disorders may in fact be neurologic disorders with psychiatric symptoms and shown that depression is a risk factor for the development of several Neurologic disorders, including epilepsy, stroke, and Parkinson's disease. Expand
Brain structural changes in mood disorders
Abstract Neuroimaging studies allow for the identification of brain structural changes associated with mood disorders and aid in the formulation of neuroanatomical models regarding theirExpand
Cingulate-mediated depressive symptoms in neurologic disease and therapeutics.
TLDR
In this chapter, detailed descriptions of the anatomic and functional changes that are seen in depression will be discussed and a focus on the development of deep brain stimulation in the subcallosal cingulate area will be used to emphasize the conceptualization of a network model with the cingulates as a hub, where engagement of remote areas of the depression network is needed to treat depression. Expand
Brain correlates of antidepressant treatment outcome from neuroimaging studies in depression.
TLDR
Issues surrounding functional neuroimaging studies of treatment are reviewed and the proposed contribution of these studies is the development of tests that will guide case management and thus be clinically useful. Expand
Neurocognitive mechanisms in depression: implications for treatment.
TLDR
Cognitive, neuroanatomical, and pharmacological tiers of research are drawn together to identify treatment targets and directions for future investigation to identify people at risk, minimize relapse, and maximize long-term beneficial outcomes for those suffering from depression. Expand
Brain, networks, depression, and more
TLDR
This review presents the major current approaches to understanding the biological mechanisms of major depression, with a focus on complex brain networks. Expand
Identification of neural targets for the treatment of psychiatric disorders: the role of functional neuroimaging.
TLDR
An emerging neurocircuitry model of mood disorders, focusing on critical circuits of cognition and emotion, particularly those networks involved in the regulation of evaluative, expressive and experiential aspects of emotion is described. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 140 REFERENCES
The anatomy of mood disorders—review of structural neuroimaging studies
The structural neuroimaging findings in mood disorders were reviewed, to evaluate evidence for a neuroanatomic model of pathophysiology, involving the prefrontal cortex, the basal ganglia, theExpand
Frontal lobe dysfunction in secondary depression.
  • H. Mayberg
  • Medicine
  • The Journal of neuropsychiatry and clinical neurosciences
  • 1994
TLDR
The findings suggest that disruption of paralimbic pathways linking frontal cortex, temporal cortex, and striatum may contribute to both primary depression and depression associated with basal ganglia disease, and support the evolving concept of a neuroanatomical locus for mood regulation. Expand
Cognitive impairment and cerebral structure by MRI in bipolar disorder
TLDR
These bipolar patients with a DSM-III-R diagnosis of bipolar affective disorder proved to have significant levels of diffusely represented cognitive impairment when compared with controls, and the degree of impairment was significantly correlated with reduction in midsagittal areas of brain structures measured on magnetic resonance imaging scans. Expand
Structural neuroimaging and mood disorders: Recent findings, implications for classification, and future directions
TLDR
There is enough evidence to begin to evaluate inclusion of neuroimaging findings in the mood disorder classification system, and two new mood disorder subtypes are proposed, vascular depression and vascular mania are proposed. Expand
A magnetic resonance imaging study of putamen nuclei in major depression
TLDR
These results are the first demonstration of diminished putamen volumes in depression and further support a role for basal ganglia structures in the etiopathogenesis of depression. Expand
Subgenual prefrontal cortex abnormalities in mood disorders
TLDR
Using positron emission tomographic images of cerebral blood flow and rate of glucose metabolism to measure brain activity, an area of abnormally decreased activity is localized in the pre-frontal cortex ventral to the genu of the corpus callosum in both familial bipolar depressives and familial unipolar depressives. Expand
3D MRI studies of neuroanatomic changes in unipolar major depression: the role of stress and medical comorbidity
  • Y. Sheline
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • 2000
TLDR
Combining MRI studies with functional studies has the potential to localize abnormalities in blood flow, metabolism, and neurotransmitter receptors and provide a better integrated model of depression. Expand
Affective disorders and cerebral vascular disease.
TLDR
Post-stroke mania is strongly associated with both a right hemisphere lesion in a limbic-connected area and a second predisposing factor, such as genetic loading for affective disorder, pre-existing subcortical atrophy or seizure disorder. Expand
Hippocampal volume reduction in major depression.
TLDR
These findings are consistent with smaller left hippocampal volume in depression, and were significant after brain size, alcohol exposure, age, and education were controlled for. Expand
Is subcortical disease associated with a poor response to antidepressants? Neurological, neuropsychological and neuroradiological findings in late-life depression.
TLDR
In late-life depression a poor response to antidepressant monotherapy can be expected in those patients with a frontal lobe syndrome, extrapyramidal signs or if MRI T2-weighted lesions are present in both the basal ganglia and the pontine reticular formation. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...