Neuroimaging of Language: Why Hasn't a Clearer Picture Emerged?

@article{Fedorenko2009NeuroimagingOL,
  title={Neuroimaging of Language: Why Hasn't a Clearer Picture Emerged?},
  author={Evelina Fedorenko and Nancy Kanwisher},
  journal={Lang. Linguistics Compass},
  year={2009},
  volume={3},
  pages={839-865}
}
Two broad questions have driven dozens of studies on the neural basis of language published in the last several decades: (i) Are distinct cortical regions engaged in different aspects of language? (ii) Are regions engaged in language processing specific to the domain of language? Neuroimaging has not yet provided clear answers to either question. In this paper, we discuss one factor that is a likely contributor to the unclear state of affairs in the neurocognition of language, and that, in our… Expand
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