Neuroimaging Support for Discrete Neural Correlates of Basic Emotions: A Voxel-based Meta-analysis

@article{Vytal2010NeuroimagingSF,
  title={Neuroimaging Support for Discrete Neural Correlates of Basic Emotions: A Voxel-based Meta-analysis},
  author={Katherine Vytal and Stephan Hamann},
  journal={Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience},
  year={2010},
  volume={22},
  pages={2864-2885}
}
  • K. Vytal, S. Hamann
  • Published 1 December 2010
  • Psychology, Computer Science, Medicine
  • Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
What is the basic structure of emotional experience and how is it represented in the human brain? One highly influential theory, discrete basic emotions, proposes a limited set of basic emotions such as happiness and fear, which are characterized by unique physiological and neural profiles. Although many studies using diverse methods have linked particular brain structures with specific basic emotions, evidence from individual neuroimaging studies and from neuroimaging meta-analyses has been… 
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