Neuroglia: the 150 years after

@article{Kettenmann2008NeurogliaT1,
  title={Neuroglia: the 150 years after},
  author={Helmut Kettenmann and Alexei Verkhratsky},
  journal={Trends in Neurosciences},
  year={2008},
  volume={31},
  pages={653-659}
}
One hundred and fifty years ago on 3 April 1858, at 37 years of age, Rudolf Virchow (Box 1) promulgated the concept of neuroglia in a lecture delivered at the New Pathology Institute of Berlin University. This lecture was part of a series of 20 lectures for colleagues and medical practitioners, and the 13th was entitled ‘Spinal cord and the brain’. In that lecture, Virchow made public his earlier thoughts [1] on the brain connective tissue, the ‘nervenkitt’ or nerve-cement, which he termed… Expand
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