Neuroethics and the Problem of Other Minds: Implications of Neuroscience for the Moral Status of Brain-Damaged Patients and Nonhuman Animals

@inproceedings{Farah2008NeuroethicsAT,
  title={Neuroethics and the Problem of Other Minds: Implications of Neuroscience for the Moral Status of Brain-Damaged Patients and Nonhuman Animals},
  author={Martha J. Farah},
  year={2008}
}
Our ethical obligations to another being depend at least in part on that being’s capacity for a mental life. Our usual approach to inferring the mental state of another is to reason by analogy: If another being behaves as I do in a circumstance that engenders a certain mental state in me, I conclude that it has engendered the same mental state in him or her. Unfortunately, as philosophers have long noted, this analogy is fallible because behavior and mental states are only contingently related… CONTINUE READING
BETA

Figures, Tables, and Topics from this paper.

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
SHOWING 1-10 OF 40 REFERENCES

Minding mammals

  • A. Shriver
  • Philosophical Psychology
  • 2006
2 Excerpts

Functional imaging in cognitive neuroscience I: Basic principles

  • G. K. Aguirre
  • In Patient-Based Approaches to Cognitive…
  • 2005
1 Excerpt

Functional imaging in cognitive neuroscience II: Imaging patients

  • C. J. Price, K. J. Friston
  • In Patientbased approaches to cognitive…
  • 2005
1 Excerpt

Similar Papers

Loading similar papers…