Neuroendocrinology of the skin

@article{mijewski2011NeuroendocrinologyOT,
  title={Neuroendocrinology of the skin},
  author={Michał A. Żmijewski and Andrzej T. Slominski},
  journal={Dermato-Endocrinology},
  year={2011},
  volume={3},
  pages={10 - 3}
}
The concept on the skin neuro-endocrine has been formulated ten years ago, and recent advances in the field further strengthened this role. Thus, skin forms a bidirectional platform for a signal exchange with other peripheral organs, endocrine and immune systems or brain to enable rapid and selective responses to the environment in order to maintain local and systemic homeostasis. In this context, it is not surprising that the function of the skin is tightly regulated by systemic neuro… Expand
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