Neurocognitive Contributions to Motor Skill Learning: The Role of Working Memory

@article{Seidler2012NeurocognitiveCT,
  title={Neurocognitive Contributions to Motor Skill Learning: The Role of Working Memory},
  author={Rachael D. Seidler and Jin Bo and Joaquin A. Anguera},
  journal={Journal of Motor Behavior},
  year={2012},
  volume={44},
  pages={445 - 453}
}
ABSTRACT Researchers have begun to delineate the precise nature and neural correlates of the cognitive processes that contribute to motor skill learning. The authors review recent work from their laboratory designed to further understand the neurocognitive mechanisms of skill acquisition. The authors have demonstrated an important role for spatial working memory in 2 different types of motor skill learning, sensorimotor adaptation and motor sequence learning. They have shown that individual… 
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