Neurobiological mechanisms involved in sleep bruxism.

@article{Lavigne2003NeurobiologicalMI,
  title={Neurobiological mechanisms involved in sleep bruxism.},
  author={G. Lavigne and T. Kato and A. Kolta and B. Sessle},
  journal={Critical reviews in oral biology and medicine : an official publication of the American Association of Oral Biologists},
  year={2003},
  volume={14 1},
  pages={
          30-46
        }
}
  • G. Lavigne, T. Kato, +1 author B. Sessle
  • Published 2003
  • Medicine
  • Critical reviews in oral biology and medicine : an official publication of the American Association of Oral Biologists
Sleep bruxism (SB) is reported by 8% of the adult population and is mainly associated with rhythmic masticatory muscle activity (RMMA) characterized by repetitive jaw muscle contractions (3 bursts or more at a frequency of 1 Hz). The consequences of SB may include tooth destruction, jaw pain, headaches, or the limitation of mandibular movement, as well as tooth-grinding sounds that disrupt the sleep of bed partners. SB is probably an extreme manifestation of a masticatory muscle activity… Expand
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