Neurobehavioural changes in patients following brain tumour: patients and relatives perspective

@article{Gregg2014NeurobehaviouralCI,
  title={Neurobehavioural changes in patients following brain tumour: patients and relatives perspective},
  author={Nancy Lorene Gregg and Anne Arber and Keyoumars Ashkan and Lucy Brazil and Ranjeev Singh Bhangoo and Ronald P. Beaney and Richard W. Gullan and Victoria Hurwitz and Angela de Lacy Costello and Lidia Y{\'a}g{\"u}ez},
  journal={Supportive Care in Cancer},
  year={2014},
  volume={22},
  pages={2965-2972}
}
PurposePatients and relatives experiences of behavioural and personality changes following brain tumour were assessed to determine whether these changes are more prominent in the experience of patients with frontal tumours and their relatives as a first step to evaluate the need to develop appropriate support and management of such changes, which have a substantial impact on social functioning, and ultimately to improve quality of life.MethodsPatients and relatives rated the patients’ current… Expand
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