Neuroanatomy of sea spiders implies an appendicular origin of the protocerebral segment

@article{Maxmen2005NeuroanatomyOS,
  title={Neuroanatomy of sea spiders implies an appendicular origin of the protocerebral segment},
  author={Amy Maxmen and William E. Browne and Mark Q. Martindale and Gonzalo Giribet},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2005},
  volume={437},
  pages={1144-1148}
}
Independent specialization of arthropod body segments has led to more than a century of debate on the homology of morphologically diverse segments, each defined by a lateral appendage and a ganglion of the central nervous system. [...] Key Result We show that the first pair of appendages, the chelifores, are innervated at an anterior position on the protocerebrum. This is the first true appendage shown to be innervated by the protocerebrum, and thus pycnogonid chelifores are not positionally homologous to…Expand
The chelifores of sea spiders (Arthropoda, Pycnogonida) are the appendages of the deutocerebral segment
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TLDR
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  • Biology, Medicine
  • Arthropod structure & development
  • 2006
TLDR
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