Neuroanatomical correlates of pleasant and unpleasant emotion

@article{Lane1997NeuroanatomicalCO,
  title={Neuroanatomical correlates of pleasant and unpleasant emotion},
  author={Richard D. Lane and Eric M. Reiman and Margaret M. Bradley and Peter J. Lang and Geoffrey L. Ahern and Richard J. Davidson and Gary E. Schwartz},
  journal={Neuropsychologia},
  year={1997},
  volume={35},
  pages={1437-1444}
}

Cerebral blood flow changes associated with attribution of emotional valence to pleasant, unpleasant, and neutral visual stimuli in a PET study of normal subjects.

Observing and assigning emotional value to unpleasant stimuli produced activations in subcortical limbic regions, whereas evaluation of pleasant stimuli produced activateations in cortical limbic areas, consistent with the notion of a subCortical and archaic danger recognition system and a system detecting pleasantness in events and situations that is phylogenetically younger.

Effect of impaired recognition and expression of emotions on frontocingulate cortices: an fMRI study of men with alexithymia.

Findings provide direct evidence that alexithymia, a personality trait playing a role in affect regulation, is linked with differences in anterior cingulate and mediofrontal activity during emotional stimuli processing.

Brain Activations to Emotional Pictures are Differentially Associated with Valence and Arousal Ratings

Findings support the notion that the amygdala is primarily involved in processing of unpleasant stimuli, particularly to more arousing unpleasant stimuli.

Neuroanatomical correlates of happiness, sadness, and disgust.

This study identifies regions of the brain that participate in happiness, sadness, and disgust, regions that distinguish between positive and negative emotions, and regions that depend on both the elicitor and valence of emotion or their interaction.

The Emotional Modulation of Cognitive Processing: An fMRI Study

Results provide evidence that the emotional valence and arousing nature of stimuli used during the performance of an attention-demanding cognitive task are reflected in discernable, quantitative changes in the functional anatomy associated with task performance.

Neural Correlates of Levels of Emotional Awareness: Evidence of an Interaction between Emotion and Attention in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex

This work used positron emission tomography and 15O-water to measure cerebral blood flow in healthy women during film- and recall-induced emotion and correlated CBF changes attributable to emotion with subjects' scores on the Levels of Emotional Awareness Scale (LEAS), a measure of individual differences in the capacity to experience emotion in a differentiated and complex way.

Neural Substrate of the Late Positive Potential in Emotional Processing

The results suggest that LPP is generated and modulated by an extensive brain network composed of both cortical and subcortical structures associated with visual and emotional processing and the degree of contribution by each of these structures to the LPP modulation is valence specific.

Functional neuroanatomy of emotions: A meta-analysis

Novel statistical techniques were applied to the meta-analysis of 106 PET and fMRI studies of human emotion and predictions made by key neuroscientific models demonstrated partial support for asymmetry accounts.
...

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