Neural sources of performance decline during continuous multitasking

@article{AlHashimi2015NeuralSO,
  title={Neural sources of performance decline during continuous multitasking},
  author={Omar Al-Hashimi and Theodore P. Zanto and Adam Gazzaley},
  journal={Cortex},
  year={2015},
  volume={71},
  pages={49-57}
}
Multitasking performance costs have largely been characterized by experiments that involve two overlapping and punctuated perceptual stimuli, as well as punctuated responses to each task. Here, participants engaged in a continuous performance paradigm during fMRI recording to identify neural signatures associated with multitasking costs under more natural conditions. Our results demonstrated that only a single brain region, the superior parietal lobule (SPL), exhibited a significant… 

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