Neural representation of abstract and concrete concepts: A meta‐analysis of neuroimaging studies

@article{Wang2010NeuralRO,
  title={Neural representation of abstract and concrete concepts: A meta‐analysis of neuroimaging studies},
  author={Jing Wang and Julie A Conder and David N. Blitzer and Svetlana V. Shinkareva},
  journal={Human Brain Mapping},
  year={2010},
  volume={31}
}
A number of studies have investigated differences in neural correlates of abstract and concrete concepts with disagreement across results. A quantitative, coordinate‐based meta‐analysis combined data from 303 participants across 19 functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) studies to identify the differences in neural representation of abstract and concrete concepts. Studies that reported peak activations in standard space in contrast of abstract… 
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