Neural repetition suppression to identity is abolished by other-race faces.

@article{Vizioli2010NeuralRS,
  title={Neural repetition suppression to identity is abolished by other-race faces.},
  author={Luca Vizioli and Guillaume A. Rousselet and Roberto Caldara},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={2010},
  volume={107 46},
  pages={20081-6}
}
Human beings are remarkably skilled at recognizing faces, with the marked exception of other-race faces: the so-called "other-race effect." As reported nearly a century ago [Feingold CA (1914) Journal of Criminal Law and Police Science 5:39-51], this face-recognition impairment is accompanied by the popular belief that other-race faces all look alike. However, the neural mechanisms underlying this high-level "perceptual illusion" are still unknown. To address this question, we recorded high… CONTINUE READING

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: Evidence from a cross - cultural study

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