Neural mechanisms of language comprehension: Challenges to syntax

@article{Kuperberg2007NeuralMO,
  title={Neural mechanisms of language comprehension: Challenges to syntax},
  author={Gina R. Kuperberg},
  journal={Brain Research},
  year={2007},
  volume={1146},
  pages={23-49}
}
  • G. Kuperberg
  • Published 2007
  • Computer Science, Medicine
  • Brain Research
In 1980, the N400 event-related potential was described in association with semantic anomalies within sentences. When, in 1992, a second waveform, the P600, was reported in association with syntactic anomalies and ambiguities, the story appeared to be complete: the brain respected a distinction between semantic and syntactic representation and processes. Subsequent studies showed that the P600 to syntactic anomalies and ambiguities was modulated by lexical and discourse factors. Most… Expand
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