Neural mechanisms in Williams syndrome: a unique window to genetic influences on cognition and behaviour

@article{MeyerLindenberg2006NeuralMI,
  title={Neural mechanisms in Williams syndrome: a unique window to genetic influences on cognition and behaviour},
  author={A. Meyer-Lindenberg and C. Mervis and K. Berman},
  journal={Nature Reviews Neuroscience},
  year={2006},
  volume={7},
  pages={380-393}
}
Williams syndrome, a rare disorder caused by hemizygous microdeletion of about 28 genes on chromosome 7q11.23, has long intrigued neuroscientists with its unique combination of striking behavioural abnormalities, such as hypersociability, and characteristic neurocognitive profile. Williams syndrome, therefore, raises fundamental questions about the neural mechanisms of social behaviour, the modularity of mind and brain development, and provides a privileged setting to understand genetic… Expand
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