Neural drive increases following resistance training in patients with multiple sclerosis

@article{Dalgas2013NeuralDI,
  title={Neural drive increases following resistance training in patients with multiple sclerosis},
  author={Ulrik Dalgas and Egon Stenager and Caroline Lund and Cuno Rasmussen and Thor Petersen and Henrik S{\o}rensen and Thorsten Ingemann-Hansen and Kristian Overgaard},
  journal={Journal of Neurology},
  year={2013},
  volume={260},
  pages={1822-1832}
}
The present study tested the hypothesis that lower body progressive resistance training (PRT) increases the neural drive expressed as surface electromyographical (EMG) activity in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The study was a randomised controlled trial (RCT) including a 12-week follow up period. Thirty-eight MS patients were randomized to an exercise group (n = 19) or a control group (n = 19). During the intervention period, the exercise group performed a 12-week supervised lower body… 
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