• Corpus ID: 15107971

Neural correlates of rapid auditory processing are disrupted in children with developmental dyslexia and ameliorated with training: an fMRI study.

@article{Gaab2007NeuralCO,
  title={Neural correlates of rapid auditory processing are disrupted in children with developmental dyslexia and ameliorated with training: an fMRI study.},
  author={Nadine Gaab and John D. E. Gabrieli and Gayle K. Deutsch and Paula Tallal and Elise Temple},
  journal={Restorative neurology and neuroscience},
  year={2007},
  volume={25 3-4},
  pages={
          295-310
        }
}
PURPOSE Developmental dyslexia, characterized by unexpected difficulty in reading, may involve a fundamental deficit in processing rapid acoustic stimuli. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) we previously reported that adults with developmental dyslexia have a disruption in neural response to rapid acoustic stimuli in left prefrontal cortex. Here we examined the neural correlates of rapid auditory processing in children. METHODS Whole-brain fMRI was performed on twenty-two… 

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