Neural correlates of age-related visual search decline: A combined ERP and sLORETA study

@article{LorenzoLpez2008NeuralCO,
  title={Neural correlates of age-related visual search decline: A combined ERP and sLORETA study},
  author={Laura Lorenzo-L{\'o}pez and Elena Amenedo and Roberto D. Pascual-Marqui and Fernando Cadaveira},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2008},
  volume={41},
  pages={511-524}
}
Differences in the neural systems underlying visual search processes for young (n=17, mean age 19.6+/-1.9) and older (n=22, mean age 68.5+/-6) subjects were investigated combining the Event-Related Potential (ERP) technique with standardized Low-Resolution brain Electromagnetic Tomography (sLORETA) analyses. Behavioral results showed an increase in mean reaction times (RTs) and a reduction in hit rates with age. The ERPs were significantly different between young and older subjects at the P3… Expand
Age-related spatiotemporal reorganization during response inhibition.
  • X. Hong, Junfeng Sun, J. Bengson, S. Tong
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology
  • 2014
TLDR
Sources analysis on inhibition-related ERP components that were recorded while healthy younger and older adults participated in a visual Go/NoGo task found that older adults showed increased source current densities of the N2 and P3 components than younger adults, which support previous hemodynamic findings. Expand
Age-related Changes to Attention and Working Memory: An Electrophysiological Study
The aim of this thesis was to help elucidate the mechanisms that underlie age-related decline in visual selective attention and working memory (WM). Older and younger adults completed a behaviouralExpand
Age-related frontoparietal changes during the control of bottom-up and top-down attention: an ERP study
TLDR
Evidence that younger and older adults recruit different frontal-parietal networks during top-down and bottom-up attention is provided, with older adults increasing their recruitment of a more frontally distributed network in both of these types of attention. Expand
The influence of working memory performance on event-related potentials in young and older adults
TLDR
It is suggested that brain activity during a WM task is influenced by individual differences in performance level, and some older adults can maintain high WM performance and capacity through recruitment of additional brain regions. Expand
Age-related changes in brain activity are specific for high order cognitive processes during successful encoding of information in working memory
TLDR
Old adults seem to improve their performance the longer they take to evaluate the stimulus they encode in visual WM, as reflected in larger mean voltages in high than low load conditions between 550 and 1000 ms post-stimulus for young and old adults. Expand
Response processing during visual search in normal aging: The need for more time to prevent cross talk between spatial attention and manual response selection
TLDR
Results suggest that older participants need more time to allocate spatial attention onto the target and to prevent cross talk between response selection and attention direction (N2cc), and that they are slower and need higher cortical activation when preparing and executing correctly selected responses (MP). Expand
Is Visual Motion Processing Vulnerable to Early Aging
While many behavioral capacities decline with age, few can be readily noticed in the early stages of aging. Visual motion processing is particularly sensitive to aging; yet it is unclear whetherExpand
Electrocortical Activity Differences Related to Saccadic Movements between Bipolar Patients and Healthy Subjects
Objective: The present study aimed to investigate and to compare the electrophysiological changes in bipolar patients and healthy subjects during the execution of a saccade task. Materials andExpand
Hyperactivity within an extensive cortical distribution associated with excessive sensitivity in error processing in unmedicated depression: a combined event-related potential and sLORETA study.
  • Yingying Tang, Xuanhong Zhang, +7 authors Jijun Wang
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology
  • 2013
TLDR
The comparable error rate and longer reaction time in individuals with depression as compared to healthy controls suggested a trade-off between accuracy and speed, and the amplitude of the ERN and CRN was significantly enhanced in depression. Expand
Age-related differences in the P3 amplitude in change blindness
TLDR
The P3 component of the event-related potential was measured while younger, middle-aged, and older participants performed a change detection task under different task demands, finding that less confidence in own responses may explain the decline of change detection performance in normal aging. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 116 REFERENCES
Effects of aging on event-related brain potentials (ERPs) in a visual detection task.
TLDR
The findings of age-related changes in P3 peak latency and distribution to a non-oddball task in the visual modality are extended and the possibility that short-latency ERPs may index changes in visual attention in the elderly is raised. Expand
Feature processing during visual search in normal aging: Electrophysiological evidence
TLDR
The N2pc component observed for orientation targets was significantly delayed and attenuated in older subjects compared to young subjects, suggesting a specific impairment of the allocation of visuospatial attention with advancing age. Expand
Event-related potentials and eyeblink responses in automatic and controlled processing: effects of age.
TLDR
The data demonstrate that the electrophysiological responses of the elderly are different from the young both in tasks eliciting automatic responses and in tasks requiring controlled processing. Expand
Effects of aging on event-related brain potentials and reaction times in an auditory oddball task.
Auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from 71 healthy individuals between 18 and 82 years of age during performance of a disjunctive reaction time task in an auditory oddballExpand
Age-related changes in involuntary and voluntary attention as reflected in components of the event-related potential (ERP)
  • A. Kok
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Biological Psychology
  • 2000
TLDR
The present paper provides an overview of age-related changes in both involuntary and voluntary attention in adult subjects as manifested in scalp-recorded ERPs, finding that search-related negativities in the ERPs are smaller and of longer duration in old than in young subjects over the central and anterior scalp sites. Expand
Attentional Control in the Aging Brain: Insights from an fMRI Study of the Stroop Task
Several recent studies of aging and cognition have attributed decreases in the efficiency of working memory processes to possible declines in attentional control, the mechanism(s) by which the brainExpand
Neurophysiological signals of working memory in normal aging.
To examine how neurophysiological signals of working memory (WM) change with normal aging, we recorded EEGs from healthy groups (n=10 each) of young (mean age=21 years), middle-aged (mean=47 years),Expand
Clinical application of the P3 component of event-related potentials. I. Normal aging.
TLDR
Normal adult volunteer subjects ranging in age from 18 to 90 years participated in a study in which analogous auditory and visual paradigms were used to elicit event-related potentials (ERPs) with a prominent P3 component. Expand
Visual target processing in high- and low-performing older subjects indexed by P3 component
TLDR
Data suggest a specific decline in visual target processing in the low-performing older subjects, which would imply a reduction in these attentional brain resources that are allocated to correctly select the relevant stimuli. Expand
Age-related changes in cortical blood flow activation during visual processing of faces and location
  • C. Grady, J. Maisog, +6 authors J. Haxby
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience
  • 1994
TLDR
The results demonstrate that reliable age-related changes during visual processing can be found in rCBF patterns, suggesting more efficient use of occipital visual areas by younger subjects and more reliance by older subjects on one or more cortical networks, particularly for spatial vision, perhaps to compensate for reduced processing efficiency of Occipital cortex. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...