Neural control and coordination of jumping in froghopper insects.

@article{Burrows2007NeuralCA,
  title={Neural control and coordination of jumping in froghopper insects.},
  author={Malcolm Burrows},
  journal={Journal of neurophysiology},
  year={2007},
  volume={97 1},
  pages={
          320-30
        }
}
  • M. Burrows
  • Published 2007
  • Biology
  • Journal of neurophysiology
The thrust for jumping in froghopper insects is produced by a rapid, synchronous depression of both hind legs generated by huge, multipartite trochanteral depressor muscles in the thorax and smaller levator muscles in the coxae. A three-phase motor pattern activates these muscles in jumping. First, a levation phase lasts a few hundred milliseconds, in which a burst of spikes in the trochanteral levator motor neurons moves the hind legs into their fully cocked position and thus engages a… 

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  • 2006
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  • 2007
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  • 2009
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  • M. Burrows
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