Neural circuitry underlying pain modulation: expectation, hypnosis, placebo

@article{Ploghaus2003NeuralCU,
  title={Neural circuitry underlying pain modulation: expectation, hypnosis, placebo},
  author={Alexander Ploghaus and Lino Becerra and Cristina Puig Borr{\`a}s and David Borsook},
  journal={Trends in Cognitive Sciences},
  year={2003},
  volume={7},
  pages={197-200}
}
The ability to predict the likelihood of an aversive event is an important adaptive capacity. Certainty and uncertainty regarding pain cause different adaptive behavior, emotional states, attentional focus, and perceptual changes. Recent functional neuroimaging studies indicate that certain and uncertain expectation are mediated by different neural pathways-the former having been associated with activity in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex and posterior cerebellum, the latter with… CONTINUE READING

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Isolating the modulatory effect of expectation on pain transmission: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

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