Neural bases of asymmetric language switching in second-language learners: An ER-fMRI study

@article{Wang2007NeuralBO,
  title={Neural bases of asymmetric language switching in second-language learners: An ER-fMRI study},
  author={Yapeng Wang and Gui Xue and Chuansheng Chen and Feng Xue and Qi Dong},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2007},
  volume={35},
  pages={862-870}
}
Using the ER-fMRI technique, the present study was designed to investigate the neural substrates of language switching among second-language learners. Twelve Chinese college students who were learning English were scanned when they performed language switching tasks (naming pictures in their first [L1, Chinese] and second [L2, English] languages according to response cues). Compared to non-switching conditions, language switching elicited greater activation in the right superior prefrontal… Expand
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