Neural Processes Supporting Young and Older Adults' Emotional Memories

@article{Kensinger2008NeuralPS,
  title={Neural Processes Supporting Young and Older Adults' Emotional Memories},
  author={Elizabeth A. Kensinger and Daniel L. Schacter},
  journal={Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience},
  year={2008},
  volume={20},
  pages={1161-1173}
}
Young and older adults are more likely to remember emotional information than neutral information. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging study examined the neural processes supporting young (ages 1835) and older (ages 6279) adults' successful encoding of positive, negative, and neutral objects (e.g., a sundae, a grenade, a canoe). The results revealed general preservation of the emotional memory network across the age groups. Both groups recruited the amygdala and the orbito-frontal… 
Age-related changes in the neural mechanisms supporting emotion processing and emotional memory
Older adults process emotional information differently than young adults, placing more emphasis on pleasant information. Age-related changes in emotional processing have downstream effects on the
Emotional Memory in Younger and Older Adults
textabstractThis thesis focuses on the interaction between emotion and cognition, which changes with advancing age. The goals of this project were to examine age differences in emotional modulation
Impact of Negative Emotion on the Neural Correlates of Long-Term Recognition in Younger and Older Adults
TLDR
Recognition of neutral and negative scenes after 1- and 3-week retention intervals in younger and older adults using functional magnetic resonance imaging is assessed in order to disentangle successful, false, and true recognition.
Post-Encoding Amygdala-Visuosensory Coupling Is Associated with Negative Memory Bias in Healthy Young Adults
TLDR
These findings provide the first evidence linking post-encoding amygdala modulation to the degree of negative or positive memory bias, emphasizing the need for valence-based accounts of the amygdala's role in emotional memory.
Amygdala Functional Connectivity with Medial Prefrontal Cortex at Rest Predicts the Positivity Effect in Older Adults' Memory
TLDR
Memory positivity in older adults was associated with (a) enhanced MPFC activity when learning emotional faces and (b) increased negative functional coupling between amygdala and MPFC when learning negative faces, and stronger MPFC–amygdala connectivity during rest was predictive of subsequent greater MP FC activity whenlearning emotional faces.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 84 REFERENCES
Aging and the Neural Correlates of Successful Picture Encoding: Frontal Activations Compensate for Decreased Medial-Temporal Activity
TLDR
Detailed fMRI analyses suggest that prefrontal regions could serve a compensatory role for declines in medial-temporal activations with age, and correlations between inferior frontal and parahippocampal activity were significantly negative for old but not young.
Aging and emotional memory: the forgettable nature of negative images for older adults.
TLDR
The relative number of negative images compared with positive and neutral images recalled decreased with each successively older age group, and recognition memory showed a similar decrease with age in the relative memory advantage for negative pictures.
Aging and motivated cognition: the positivity effect in attention and memory
Goal-directed memory: the role of cognitive control in older adults' emotional memory.
TLDR
It is revealed that older adults recruit cognitive control processes to strengthen positive and diminish negative information in memory, and younger adults showed no signs of using cognitive control to make their memories more positive, indicating that, for them, emotion regulation goals are not chronically activated.
Effects of emotion on memory specificity in young and older adults.
TLDR
To examine how emotional content affects the amount of visual detail remembered, young and older adults study neutral, negative, and positive objects and showed enhanced specific recognition for negative (not positive) objects.
The Mellow Years?: Neural Basis of Improving Emotional Stability over Age
TLDR
It is demonstrated that emotional stability improves linearly over seven decades of the human lifespan, and an integrative model is proposed in which accumulated life experience and the motivation for meaning over acquisition in older age contribute to plasticity of medial prefrontal systems, achieving a greater selective control over emotional functions.
Age-related differences in brain activation during emotional face processing
Effects of normal aging and Alzheimer's disease on emotional memory.
TLDR
Young and older adults, but not AD patients, showed better memory for emotional versus neutral pictures and words, whereas young adults remembered more items embedded in an emotional versusneutral context.
Aging, self-referencing, and medial prefrontal cortex
TLDR
It is found that both groups engage medial prefrontal cortex and mid-cingulate during self-referencing and Elderly (but not young) showed increased activity in the dorsal prefrontal cortex for positive relative to negative items, which could reflect an increase in controlled processing of positive information for elderly adults.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...