Neural Mechanisms of the Testosterone–Aggression Relation: The Role of Orbitofrontal Cortex

@article{Mehta2010NeuralMO,
  title={Neural Mechanisms of the Testosterone–Aggression Relation: The Role of Orbitofrontal Cortex},
  author={Pranjal H. Mehta and Jennifer S. Beer},
  journal={Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience},
  year={2010},
  volume={22},
  pages={2357-2368}
}
  • P. Mehta, J. Beer
  • Published 2010
  • Psychology, Computer Science, Medicine
  • Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Testosterone plays a role in aggressive behavior, but the mechanisms remain unclear. The present study tested the hypothesis that testosterone influences aggression through the OFC, a region implicated in self-regulation and impulse control. In a decision-making paradigm in which people chose between aggression and monetary reward (the ultimatum game), testosterone was associated with increased aggression following social provocation (rejecting unfair offers). The effect of testosterone on… Expand
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Testosterone, cortisol, and serotonin as key regulators of social aggression: A review and theoretical perspective
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A theoretical framework is provided for the role of steroids and serotonin in impulsive social aggression in humans and how they might modulate the aggression circuitry of the human brain is focused on. Expand
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