Neural Correlates of a Magnetic Sense

@article{Wu2012NeuralCO,
  title={Neural Correlates of a Magnetic Sense},
  author={Le-Qing Wu and J. David Dickman},
  journal={Science},
  year={2012},
  volume={336},
  pages={1054 - 1057}
}
Magnetic Sense Many species orient and navigate using aspects of Earth's magnetic field. Magnetic receptors have been found in the eyes, ears, and bills of birds, but there has been no clear evidence of the neural mechanism by which magnetic signals are translated into direction. Recording from the brainstem within conscious pigeons, Wu and Dickman (p. 1054, published online 26 April; see the Perspective by Winklhofer) reveal the presence of neurons in the pigeon's brain that encode the… 
The Magnetic Senses
The Earth’s magnetic field potentially provides information which can help animals to navigate over both short and long distances. Magnetic information can be useful to determine position (i.e., as
Instrumentation to investigate the magnetoreception of homing pigeons by using applied magnetic fields
The remarkable ability of diverse animals to orientate and navigate during migration and homing over long distances has fascinated scientists for years. However, how the birds sense and process the
Magnetoreception in birds
Birds can use two kinds of information from the geomagnetic field for navigation: the direction of the field lines as a compass and probably magnetic intensity as a component of the navigational
Neuronal circuits and the magnetic sense: central questions
TLDR
It is predicted that magnetic circuits are likely to share anatomical motifs with other senses, which culminates in the formation of spatial maps in telencephalic areas of the brain, and the existence of spatial cells that encode defined components of the Earth's magnetic field is predicted.
Magnetoreception systems in birds: A review of current research
TLDR
It cannot be ruled out that iron-based magnetoreception takes place in lagena (a part of inner ear in fishes, amphibians, reptiles and birds), and the information perceived is processes in vestibular nuclei.
Extracellular recordings reveal absence of magneto sensitive units in the avian optic tectum
TLDR
It is shown that magneto-sensitive units do not exist in the avian tectum, and the neurophysiological basis of magnetoreception has been much less studied.
Animal navigation: a noisy magnetic sense?
TLDR
It is speculated that extensive time-averaging and/or other higher-order neural processing of magnetic information is required, rendering the magnetic sense inefficient relative to alternative cues that can be detected faster and with less effort.
No evidence for a magnetite-based magnetoreceptor in the lagena of pigeons
An Avian Magnetometer
TLDR
How information on Earth's magnetic field is encoded in the pigeon brain is reported and a candidate magnetic sensory organ in the inner ear of the pigeon is suggested.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 48 REFERENCES
Avian magnetite-based magnetoreception: a physiologist's perspective
TLDR
The aims of the present review are to review the evidence for a magnetite-based mechanism in birds and to introduce physiological concepts in order to refine the proposed models.
Magnetic orientation and magnetoreception in birds and other animals
TLDR
Behavioral data from other animals indicate a light-dependent compass probably based on a radical pair mechanism in amphibians and a possibly magnetite-based mechanism in mammals, and Histological and electrophysiological data suggest a magnetites based mechanism in the nasal cavities of salmonid fish.
Neural basis of the magnetic compass: interactions of visual, magnetic and vestibular inputs in the pigeon's brain
TLDR
It is indicated, that information provided by magnetic cues in the earth's strength range may be conveyed from the visual to the vestibular system via a projection from the nBOR and then related to active movements of the animal.
Magnetic maps in animals: nature's GPS
TLDR
The use of magnetic positional information has been demonstrated in several diverse animals including sea turtles, spiny lobsters, newts and birds, suggesting that such systems are phylogenetically widespread and can function over a wide range of spatial scales.
Magnetic field changes activate the trigeminal brainstem complex in a migratory bird
TLDR
The results suggest that magnetic field changes activate neurons in and near the trigeminal brainstem complex and that V1 is necessary for this activation, and suggest that V 1 transmits magnetic information to the brain in this migratory passerine bird.
The physics and neurobiology of magnetoreception
TLDR
Despite recent advances, magnetoreceptors have not been identified with certainty in any animal, and the mode of transduction for the magnetic sense remains unknown.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...