Network science and the human brain: Using graph theory to understand the brain and one of its hubs, the amygdala, in health and disease.

@article{Mears2016NetworkSA,
  title={Network science and the human brain: Using graph theory to understand the brain and one of its hubs, the amygdala, in health and disease.},
  author={David Mears and Harvey B Pollard},
  journal={Journal of neuroscience research},
  year={2016},
  volume={94 6},
  pages={
          590-605
        }
}
Over the past 15 years, the emerging field of network science has revealed the key features of brain networks, which include small-world topology, the presence of highly connected hubs, and hierarchical modularity. The value of network studies of the brain is underscored by the range of network alterations that have been identified in neurological and psychiatric disorders, including epilepsy, depression, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and many others. Here we briefly summarize the… CONTINUE READING
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